Annotation Checklist

My dad found this Thursday, September 16, on his way home from work in front of La Canada Imports. I looks like an oversized bookmark for a student in an English class. It’s printed on yellow paper; both sides are in bold-face type. There’s a crease about halfway down the paper all the way through, as if someone had folded it in half before putting it in a book. The front uses circular bullet points, while the back uses quad diamond bullet points; I’m using “—” here for simplicity’s sake. (Click the images for larger versions.)

The front reads:

Annotation Checklist frontAnnotation Checklist
—text-to-self, text-to-
world, text-to-text
connections

—NEW VOCABULARY

—Sense Imagery

—NEW CHARACTERS-
characterization

—diction-word choice &
how it affects tone

—Symbolism

—Irony-dramatic,
situational, verbal
—Allusion
—Appeals –
logos/ethos/pathos

—Hyperbole
—Understatement

—syntax-sentence
structure

—asyndeton(I came, I
saw, I conquered)
polysyndeton(he ran
Annotation Checklist backand jumped and
laughed for joy)

—Repetition
—anaphora-repeating a
sequence of words

—Figurative language
simile, metaphor
—Personification
—Paradox-contradiction
—Oxymoron-sharply dull

—Sound devices
alliteration-peter
piper,
assonance-do you like
blue, consonance-
mammals named Sam
are clammy
—onomatopoeia-whoosh

The back says:

— Ask – Why?
—Talk back-Comment
—Write summaries
—Leave a trail to follow
—Bracket, highlight
—Create an index

—Note the author’s style
—Reflect

I’m posting this here (even though I wasn’t the one to find it) because I learned something from it. I hadn’t known what asyndeton and polysyndeton were before Thursday evening; and, actually, I still had to look them up—one bookmark worth of information wasn’t really enough. It’s clear that this was meant as a “cliff’s notes” version of some lecture(s) to help someone study more thorough notes. My father was surprised I didn’t know those terms; apparently, having a graduate degree in English means I Know Everything There Is To Know About The English Language. (Yeah, right.)

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